Privacy (122)

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Find narratives by ethical themes or by technologies.

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  • Privacy
  • Accountability
  • Transparency and Explainability
  • Human Control of Technology
  • Professional Responsibility
  • Promotion of Human Values
  • Fairness and Non-discrimination
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  • AI
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  • Year
    • 1916 - 1966
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  • 6 min
  • Wired
  • 2019
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The Toxic Potential of YouTube’s Feedback Loop

Spreading of harmful content through Youtube’s AI recommendation engine algorithm. AI helps create filter bubbles and echo chambers. Limited user agency to be exposed to certain content.

  • Wired
  • 2019
  • 5 min
  • Kinolab
  • 1993
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Systems Errors in Entertainment Areas

Jurassic Park is an under-review theme park where innovator John Hammond has managed to use computational genomics to revive the dinosaurs. The park is managed by a complex security system, involving an internet of things which connects security cameras, other monitors, and defense systems to the computers in the control room. Computer programmer Dennis Nedry, under command of a briber, uses malware to hack the computer systems and steal dinosaur DNA, turning the park into a very hostile environment for the scientists once the safety mechanisms fail.

  • Kinolab
  • 1993
  • 5 min
  • Gizmodo
  • 2020
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Microsoft’s Creepy New ‘Productivity Score’ Gamifies Workplace Surveillance

The data privacy of employees is at risk under a new “Productivity Score” program started by Microsoft, in which employers and administrators can use Microsoft 365 platforms to collect several metrics on their workers in order to “optimize productivity.” However, this approach causes unnecessary stress for workers, beginning a surveillance program in the workplace.

  • Gizmodo
  • 2020
  • 35 min
  • Wired
  • 2021
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How Tech Transformed How We Hook Up—and Break Up

In this podcast, interviewees share several narratives which discuss how certain technologies, especially digital photo albums, social media sites, and dating apps, can change the nature of relationships and memories. Once algorithms for certain sites have an idea of what a certain user may want to see, it can be hard for the user to change that idea, as the Pinterest wedding example demonstrates. When it comes to photos, emotional reactions can be hard or nearly impossible for a machine to predict. While dating apps do not necessarily make a profit by mining data, the Match monopoly of creating different types of dating niches through a variety of apps is cause for some concern.

  • Wired
  • 2021
  • 5 min
  • Tech Crunch
  • 2020
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No Google-Fitbit merger without human rights remedies, says Amnesty to EU

During Google’s attempt to merge with the company Fitbit, the NGO Amnesty International has provided warnings to the competition regulators in the EU that such a move would be detrimental to privacy. Based on Google’s historical malpractice with user data, since its status as a tech monopoly allows it to mine data from several different avenues of a user’s life, adding wearable health-based tech to this equation puts the privacy and rights of users at risk. Calls for scrunity of “surveillance capitalism” employed by tech giants.

  • Tech Crunch
  • 2020
  • 5 min
  • Wired
  • 2020
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The Ethics of Rebooting the Dead

As means of preserving deceased loved ones digitally become more and more likely, it is critical to consider the implications of technologies which aim to replicate and capture the personality and traits of those who have passed. Not only might this change the natural process of grieving and healing, it may also have alarming consequences for the agency of the dead. For the corresponding Black Mirror episode discussed in the article, see the narratives “Martha and Ash Parts I and II.”

  • Wired
  • 2020
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