Machine Learning (70)

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Find narratives by ethical themes or by technologies.

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Themes
  • Privacy
  • Accountability
  • Transparency and Explainability
  • Human Control of Technology
  • Professional Responsibility
  • Promotion of Human Values
  • Fairness and Non-discrimination
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Technologies
  • AI
  • Big Data
  • Bioinformatics
  • Blockchain
  • Immersive Technology
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  • Year
    • 1916 - 1966
    • 1968 - 2018
    • 2019 - 2069
  • Duration
  • 5 min
  • MIT Technology Review
  • 2019
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When algorithms mess up, the nearest human gets the blame

Humans take the blame for failures of AI automated systems, protecting the integrity of the technological system and becoming a “liability sponge.” It is necessary to redefine the role of humans in sociotechnical systems.

  • MIT Technology Review
  • 2019
  • 4 min
  • VentureBeat
  • 2020
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Researchers Find that Even Fair Hiring Algorithms Can Be Biased

A study on the engine of TaskRabbit, an app which uses an algorithm to recommend the best workers for a specific task, demonstrates that even algorithms which attempt to account for fairness and parity in representation can fail to provide what they promise depending on different contexts.

  • VentureBeat
  • 2020
  • 9 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2002
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Trusting Machines and Variable Outcomes

In the year 2054, the PreCrime police program is about to go national. At PreCrime, three clairvoyant humans known as “PreCogs” are able to forecast future murders by streaming audiovisual data which provides the surrounding details of the crime, including the names of the victims and perpetrators. Although there are no cameras, the implication is that anyone can be under constant surveillance by this program. Once the “algorithm” has gleaned enough data about the future crime, officers move out to stop the murder before it happens. In this narrative, the PreCrime program is audited, and the officers must explain the ethics and philosophies at play behind their systems. After captain John Anderton is accused of a future crime, he flees, and learns of “minority reports,” or instances of disagreement between the Precogs covered up by the department to make the justice system seem infallible.

  • Kinolab
  • 2002
  • 3 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2019
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Digitally Reproducing Humans and “Possession”

In an imagined future of London, citizens all across the globe are connected to the Feed, a device and network accessed constantly through a brain-computer interface. In this narrative, Tom and Ben find out that their father Lawrence, the creator of the Feed, harvested the Feeds from dead people and used the data stored therein to upload their consciousnesses, including memories and emotions, into a cloud. After seeing the “training data” of Lawrence creating digital consciousnesses on this program, an AI was able to make many more digital consciousnesses of non-real people. These consciousnesses are then able to “possess” human bodies through being uploaded to the Feed devices implanted in real people’s brains.

  • Kinolab
  • 2019
  • 13 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2020
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Prototypes, Evolution, and Replacement with Robots

George Almore is an engineer working with a company which hopes to achieve singularity with robots, making their artificial intelligence one step above real humans. In doing this, he works with three prototypes: J1, J2, and J3, each one more advanced than the last. Simultaneously, he plans to upload his dead wife’s consciousness into the J3 robot in order to extend her life. The narrative begins with him explaining his goal to J3 as he has this robot go through taste and emotion tests. Eventually, J3 has evolved into a humanoid robot who takes on the traits of George’s wife, leaving the earlier two versions, who all have a sibling-like bond with each other, feeling neglected.

  • Kinolab
  • 2020
  • 12 min
  • Kinolab
  • 1965
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Supercomputer Rule and Condensing Human Behavior

The city of Alphaville is under the complete rule of Alpha-60, an omnipresent robot whose knowledge is more vast than that of any human. This robot, whose learning and knowledge model is deemed “too complex for human understanding,” cements its rule through effectively outlawing emotion in Alphaville, with all definitions of consciousness centering on rationality. All words expressing curiosity or emotion are erased from human access, with asking “why” being replaced with saying “because.” Lemmy is a detective who has entered Alphaville from an external land to destroy Alpha-60. However, in their conversation, Alpha-60 is immediately able to suss out the suspicious aspects of Lemmy’s visit and character.

  • Kinolab
  • 1965
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