Bioinformatics (84)

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Find narratives by ethical themes or by technologies.

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Themes
  • Privacy
  • Accountability
  • Transparency and Explainability
  • Human Control of Technology
  • Professional Responsibility
  • Promotion of Human Values
  • Fairness and Non-discrimination
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Technologies
  • AI
  • Big Data
  • Bioinformatics
  • Blockchain
  • Immersive Technology
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  • Media Type
  • Availability
  • Year
    • 1916 - 1966
    • 1968 - 2018
    • 2019 - 2069
  • Duration
  • 15 min
  • Kinolab
  • 1993
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Technological Revival of the Past

Dinosaurs are an extinct species that are revived and brought into the modern day in Jurassic Park. This is accomplished through a cloning process involving extracting dinosaur DNA from mosquitos preserved in amber, and using computational genomics to create replicants with certain properties, such as breeding only female dinosaurs. Three scientists are sent to audit the park, and all three find problems inherent with the use of technology in attempts to control life itself. Eventually, the park’s founder, John Hammond, admits that his idea to create entertainment out of this dangerous technological revival was a failure, which is seen in action during the subsequent dinosaur attack.

  • Kinolab
  • 1993
  • 14 min
  • Kinolab
  • 1973
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Technology and Educational Inequalities

On a faraway planet, kidnapped humans under the name of Oms live as an inferior race to the Draggs, giant blue aliens that either keep the Oms as pets or banish them to the wilds to be consumed by extraterrestrial monsters. One of these Oms, Terr, is the pet of Tiwa, and begins to acquire an education through a malfunction of Tiwa’s brain-computer interface, which beams knowledge directly into her head. Terr eventually uses this cutting edge technology to which Oms do not usually have access to spread knowledge to other Oms and begin a revolt.

  • Kinolab
  • 1973
  • 14 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2008
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Networked Laborers and Remote Workforces

After his family home is destroyed and his father is killed, Memo must become a part of the global economy. He is expected to do this at the Sleep Dealer Factory, where citizens of Mexico who are implanted with “nodes” connect to a brain-computer interface which they use to remotely control robots in the United States. This was meant to be a solution to the “migrant problem” to the United States in this imagined future, allowing the United States to contract labor from immigrants without actually having people cross the border. However, the wages payed by the Sleep Dealers for the exhaustive labor are incredibly low, thus most laborers there live in unlivable conditions. The technology is shown to not only be exhausting due to the menial labor, but also dangerous if someone is connected during a short-circuit.

  • Kinolab
  • 2008
  • 16 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2004
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Digital Memory Erasure and Brain Mapping

Joel Barish recently broke up with Clementine, his girlfriend of two years, in a brutal argument. After discovering that she has used a procedure known as Lacuna to erase him from her memories, Joel decides to undergo the same procedure to forget that he ever knew Clementine. The procedure uses a brain-computer interface to map the areas of Joel’s brain that are active whenever he has a memory of Clementine, first when he is awake and using associated objects to perform active recall and then when he is asleep and subconsciously remembering her. Despite Joel’s eventual regrets and desperate attempts to remember Clementine, the procedure is successful, and he forgets her. However, Joel and Clementine reunite in the real world after their respective procedures, and as they have a fresh start, they end up listening to Clementine’s tape from before the procedure where she dissects all of the flaws of Joel and their relationship.

  • Kinolab
  • 2004
  • 3 min
  • Tech Crunch
  • 2020
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What will tomorrow’s tech look like? Ask someone who can’t see.

This narrative explains that the push for technology to help with accessibility for disabled groups, especially blind or visually impaired individuals, has spurred scientific innovation which is to the benefit of everyone.

  • Tech Crunch
  • 2020
  • 4 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2020
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Augmented Communication and a Post-Privacy Era

In this imagined future, citizens interact with the world and with each other through brain-computer interface devices which augment reality in ways such as sending each other visual messages or changing one’s appearance at a moment’s notice. Additionally, with this device, everyone can automatically see a “ranking” of other people, in which Alphas or As are the best and Epsilons or Es are the worst. With all of these features of the devices, privacy in its many forms is all but outlawed in this society.

  • Kinolab
  • 2020
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