Technologies (262)

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Find narratives by ethical themes or by technologies.

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Themes
  • Privacy
  • Accountability
  • Transparency and Explainability
  • Human Control of Technology
  • Professional Responsibility
  • Promotion of Human Values
  • Fairness and Non-discrimination
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Technologies
  • AI
  • Big Data
  • Bioinformatics
  • Blockchain
  • Immersive Technology
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  • Media Type
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  • Year
    • 1916 - 1966
    • 1968 - 2018
    • 2019 - 2069
  • Duration
  • 6 min
  • Wired
  • 2019
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The Toxic Potential of YouTube’s Feedback Loop

Spreading of harmful content through Youtube’s AI recommendation engine algorithm. AI helps create filter bubbles and echo chambers. Limited user agency to be exposed to certain content.

  • Wired
  • 2019
  • 13 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2020
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Prototypes, Evolution, and Replacement with Robots

George Almore is an engineer working with a company which hopes to achieve singularity with robots, making their artificial intelligence one step above real humans. In doing this, he works with three prototypes: J1, J2, and J3, each one more advanced than the last. Simultaneously, he plans to upload his dead wife’s consciousness into the J3 robot in order to extend her life. The narrative begins with him explaining his goal to J3 as he has this robot go through taste and emotion tests. Eventually, J3 has evolved into a humanoid robot who takes on the traits of George’s wife, leaving the earlier two versions, who all have a sibling-like bond with each other, feeling neglected.

  • Kinolab
  • 2020
  • 2 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2019
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Implanted Technology and Disconnection

In an imagined future of London, citizens all across the globe are connected to the Feed, a device and network accessed constantly through a brain-computer interface. In this narrative, Max, a citizen whose Feed was hacked, has to get the device removed from his body as his best friends watch. This procedure includes the removal of some of his memories from both his brain and from the device, although they manage to upload these into a cloud.

  • Kinolab
  • 2019
  • 5 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2019
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Genetic Implants and Choice

In an imagined future of London, citizens all across the globe are connected to the Feed, a device and network accessed constantly through a brain-computer interface. Lawrence, the CEO of the tech monopoly which created the Feed, explains to his son Tom that the newest model of the Feed is a quasi-organic implant which automatically appears in the makeup of an infant’s brain; they are born with it, having no say in whether or not it should be there and being unable to remove it. Lawrence and Tom then debate the pros and cons of this approach.

  • Kinolab
  • 2019
  • 1 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2019
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Limitations of Biometrics

In an imagined future of London, citizens all across the globe are connected to the Feed, a device and network accessed constantly through a brain-computer interface. Eric is able to use Biometrics to keep Evelyn and Max hostage and get high-level access to the Feed hub. This highlights an example of how computerized security systems might not be able to pick up on hostage situations or forced activity. The Biometrics can recognize their faces, but is unable to pick up on the ‘distress’ visible on Max and Evelyn’s faces that indicate they are in trouble.

  • Kinolab
  • 2019
  • 2 min
  • Kinolab
  • 2019
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Personal Control over Memories

In an imagined future of London, citizens all across the globe are connected to the Feed, a device and network accessed constantly through a brain-computer interface. Tom, the son of the Feed’s creator Lawrence, realizes that his father had deleted some of his childhood memories from the device in his brain, thus Tom has lost all access to them. For further insights into technology and the nature of parent-child relationships, see the narratives “Marie and Sara Parts I and II.”

  • Kinolab
  • 2019
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